How to pay your bill

Our payment options and details

Payment preferences will have been part of your initial contract discussions. If you wish to change your agreed payment method, please contact us.

Direct Debit

If you pay by Direct Debit, no further action is required to pay your invoice. The amount due will be debited from your account automatically on – or immediately after – the due date.

If you would like to pay by Direct Debit, please contact us.

Migrating from E.ON UK?

If you've migrated from E.ON and want to know more about your migration, see our migration help page. This shows what is changing and how to get more help if you need it.

Automated payments

For BACS, CHAPS or Faster Payments, please send to:

Electricity payments:

National Westminster Bank plc, PO Box 34, 15 Bishopsgate, London EC2P 2AP
Sort Code: 50-00-00
Account: 97104000
Account name: Npower Commercial Gas Ltd

Gas payments:

National Westminster Bank plc, PO Box 34, 15 Bishopsgate, London EC2P 2AP
Sort Code: 50-00-00
Account: 71023909
Account name: Npower Commercial Gas Ltd

Struggling to pay?

If you are struggling to pay your invoice, we want to help, so please contact us as soon as possible.

The following organisations can provide free, impartial and confidential advice on debt and cash-flow issues to small businesses and the self employed:

Business Debtline: 0800 197 6026 or bdl.org.uk

StepChange: 0800 138 111 or stepchange.org

Request a refund

How to request a refund if your account is in credit

If you believe your account is in credit or you have been notified by us and you wish to arrange a refund, please email your request to yourbusiness@npower.com.

Please include your account number and the amount you wish to be refunded. If you pay by Direct Debit, bank card or BACs, the refund will be made to the corresponding bank account and will take a minimum of 28 working days. If you pay by cash or cheque, the refund will be made by cheque and will take a minimum of 32 working days.

Please note, if you have multiple accounts and some are in debit, a refund may not be agreed.

If you have any questions, please contact our Credit Control Team.

Understanding VAT

VAT information and codes for businesses

VAT declaration certificates and Climate Change Levy (CCL)

As a business customer, if you want to declare that a percentage of your energy is used for domestic, charitable, or diplomatic purposes - or there is a change in your circumstances which affects your declaration and the VAT you pay - please contact Customer Services.

If your business qualifies for a reduced VAT rate, fill in our VAT declaration form for electricity or VAT declaration form for gas and either email or post it to us (information can be found in our declaration forms). We will make sure the reduced rate is applied to your invoice.

CCL may be applied to your account as a result of current legislation. Where CCL has been shown, this invoice will constitute a CCL accounting document.

VAT

If part of your electricity supply qualifies for VAT reduction (i.e. domestic, residential or non-business charitable use), you should complete a certificate declaring the qualifying percentage. You must provide a revised certificate if there is any change in your circumstances which would affect the qualifying percentage.

All charges are identified by one of the following codes for VAT purposes.
DEM - Under de minimis kWh
DFR - Domestic Fuel Rate
DOM - Composite Rate
EXP - Exempt OUT - Outside the Scope
STD - Standard Rate
ZER - Zero Rate

Request a copy invoice

How to request a copy of your invoice

To request a copy of an invoice, please contact us with the following details:

Your account number
The name of your business
Invoice number(s) (if known)
Date of invoice(s)

Microbusinesses and billing

How to know if you are a microbusiness and what that means for your invoices.

What is a microbusiness?

Ofgem defines a microbusiness customer* as "a consumer supplied or requiring to be supplied with gas or electricity at premises other than domestic premises, who:

  • consumes less than 293,000 kWh of gas a year,
  • consumes less than 100,000 kWh of electricity a year, or
  • has fewer than ten employees (or their full-time equivalent) and an annual turnover or annual balance sheet total not exceeding €2 million

If your business meets at least one of the above criteria then you are a microbusiness customer.

A business only has to meet one of these three criteria to qualify as a microbusiness customer, although the consumption threshold applies to the fuel being supplied.

*As set out in article 2(1) of the Gas and Electricity Regulated Providers (Redress Scheme) Order 2008 (S.I.2008/2268).

Back-invoicing of microbusiness energy customers

We are committed to providing a quality service to our customers. As part of this, we welcome the introduction of a new licence condition, relating to the back-invoicing of energy for microbusiness customers.

This means that when we issue an invoice, we can only look to recover charges for electricity or gas (or both) used in the last 12 months, unless:

  • the invoice was sent before 1 November 2018, in which case we will always ensure that the amount you pay for charges is no more than you would have paid if we had invoiced you within the 12 months (in line with previous back-invoicing commitments with Energy UK),
  • we have already issued an invoice and are in contact with you about payment of such invoice,
  • you behave in an obstructive or manifestly unreasonable way (for example by not allowing us access to read your meter without good reason, or by stealing electricity or gas, or, where you own your meter, by failing to keep it in proper working order), or
  • we are allowed to do otherwise in accordance with additional rights and guidance specified by Ofgem.

This is our continued commitment to protecting customers.

To read more about Energy UK, visit the Energy UK website.

https://www.energy-uk.org.uk/

Understanding your invoice

Watch our short video to see how categorising your energy charges into sections has helped us create an invoice that is more accessible and transparent than ever before.

Enhancements and changes to your electricity invoicing

We remain committed to improving the products and services that we provide to our customers and have launched a complete system overhaul, offering a host of account features and benefits.

As a result, we have made a number of enhancements and changes to our invoicing formats.

Below, you'll find an overview of how these changes will affect you and your business.

What's Changing?

group_cog_dark

Group invoicing

Our legacy system provided some customers with either a group summary invoice or a group VAT invoice. In order to drive simplicity and ease of doing business, our new platform does not produce invoices at a group level.

fixed_energy_contract_dark

Bill summary

Formerly known as Excalibur, we have designed a new and improved file now called Bill Summary. The industry landscape has changed over the years which has made the Excalibur file too large and overcomplicated.

Our new file includes a new structure and more detailed information, ensuring that we remain transparent and open in our invoicing charges.

Download an example Bill Summary here or view an annotated version here.

flexibile_energy_contract_dark

Our invoicing formats

As part of our complete system overhaul we now offer more invoicing formats.

  • New Email/PDF – improvements to the invoice layout for greater simplicity for online viewing
  • Electronic Data Interchange (EDI)
  • Business Application Software Developers Association (BASDA)
  • (Coming soon) Dashboard - all PDF invoices and credit notes will soon be uploaded onto our Dashboard for you to view and print

For your reference please see links to example documents below:

Example gas documents

For your reference, please take a look at our example gas documents.

Any questions?

If you have any questions or would like further information on these changes, please email us by clicking here.

Third party and industry charges

Energy invoices are made up of a combination of the commodity cost (the fuel you consume) and non-commodity costs. Included in the non-commodity costs are government-originated charges and third party charges. Some of these charges are levied on suppliers who pass them onto the customer.

Your contract and invoice

Your contract may have these charges included in your overall agreed price; if so they won’t be shown on your invoice. Or you may have these items separated out, in which case they will be shown as separate line items on your invoice.

Examples of government originated charges are the Feed-in Tariff (FIT) and Electricity Market Reform (EMR) charges such as Contracts for Difference (CfD) and Capacity Mechanism (CM). Examples of third party charges include Distribution Use of System (DUoS), Balancing Services Use of System (BSUoS) and Transmission Network Use of System (TNUoS).

Latest updates

December 2021

As per previous commentary, customers with BSUoS passthrough agreements will be reconciled for both September and October actuals through December billing run. Additionally, customers who take CFD passthrough will be reconciled the initial CfD Quarterly Reconciliation for 1 July 21 to 30 September 21 consumption. The GEE Volume Reconciliation will also take place for the period from 1 October 2020 to 31 December 2020.

November 2021

Due to an EMR Settlement issue with the CfD Quarterly Reconciliation in October, the LCCC did not publish initial cost and volume data in time for nBS to reconcile through the November billing cycle as planned (for July to September 21 consumption). As such, we will now undertake the quarterly reconciliation as part of December billing activity.

Furthermore, there has been an additional BSUoS settlement issue this month which has led to the delay of the initial reconciliation for September consumption. We continue to await information from National Grid ESO but now expect to undertake initial reconciliations for both September and October consumption in December.

 
Explanation of invoice charge terminology and function
Charge Who it's paid to What it's for
Balancing Services Use of System (BSUoS) National Grid Charge for keeping the network in balance
Climate Change Levy (CCL) HM Revenue & Customs (HMRC) A tax on energy aimed at increasing energy efficiency and reducing carbon emissions
Contracts for Difference (CfD) HMRC Support scheme for low carbon generators which provides long-term price certainty to increase investment
Distribution Use of System (DUoS) Distribution Network Operator (DNO) Charge for distributing electricity across the distribution network to the customer supply point
Feed-in Tariff (FIT) Ofgem Levied on suppliers to fund the FIT scheme designed to incentivise new renewable generation
Flexible purchasing Supplier Charges/credits for flexible purchasing - not applicable for fixed contracts
Renewable Obligation (RO) Ofgem Levied on suppliers to fund the RO scheme
Settlement and agency charges Data Collector (DC), Data Aggregator (DA) and Meter Operator (MOP) Charges for DC (retrieving meter reads or consumption data), DA (for industry settlements purposes) and MOPs (maintaining the meter)
Transmission Network Use of Sytem (TNUoS) National Grid Charge for using and maintaining the transmission network

 

Capacity Mechanism (CM)

What is Capacity Mechanism (CM)?

CM is an Electricity Market Reform (EMR) mechanism to help the UK meet its carbon reduction targets and ensure security of electricity supply. It is designed to make sure there is sufficient power available to meet future needs. It operates as an annual auction, which started in December 2014, to procure the majority of the UK’s required energy capacity four years in advance. There is a top-up auction one year ahead of delivery to enable Demand Side Response (DSR) to participate. The cost of running the CM is passed through to consumers.

How CM is charged

For both Half-Hourly (HH) and NonHalf Hourly (NHH) the cost will either be fully passed through (with subsequent reconciliation) or fixed into unit charges
CM is made up of two elements, Obligation Costs and an Operational Cost Levy:

Obligation Costs

  • Obligation Costs reflect the costs of the capacity auctions and are charged on consumption during the winter peak period; from 16:00 and 19:00 on working days between November & February. In order to estimate CM charges, an Estimated Annual Consumption Volume (EACV) will be calculated in kWh. This is the expected volume at National Balancing Point (NBP) for the Meter Point Administration Number (MPAN) across the winter peak period.
  • Obligation Costs will initially be charged using a forecast price and the EACV, and applied to each invoice period throughout the year. In order to do this the EACV is divided by the number of days in the year, then multiplied by the number of days in the invoice period. The resultant volume is multiplied by the forecast Obligation Levy price.
  • Obligation Levy costs will then reconciled for pass through contracts using actual consumption and price once known.

Operational Costs

  • Operational Costs Levy reflects the running cost of the scheme and are set by the Electricity Settlement Company (ESC). This is a fixed unit rate per kWh for each 12-month period.

CM rates:

  Capacity Mechanism Peak Rate (p/kWh) Operational Rate (p/kWh)
Delivery month Initial Billing Rate1 Reconcilliation2 Revised Reconcilliation3 Initial Billing Rate1 Reconcilliation2

December 2020

11.77900

10.89700

Not expected

0.00312

0.00268

January 2021

11.77900

10.89700

Not expected

0.00312

0.00268

February 2021

11.77900

10.89700

Not expected

0.00312

0.00268

March 2021

11.77900

10.89700

Not expected

0.00312

0.00268

April 2021

5.54322

tbc Jun-22

Not expected

0.002780

tbc Jun-22

May 2021

5.54300

tbc Jun-22

Not expected

0.002780

tbc Jun-22

June 2021

5.54300

tbc Jun-22

Not expected

0.002780

tbc Jun-22

July 2021

5.54300

tbc Jun-22

Not expected

0.002780

tbc Jun-22

August 2021

5.54300

tbc Jun-22

Not expected

0.002780

tbc Jun-22

September 2021

5.54300

tbc Jun-22

Not expected

0.002780

tbc Jun-22

October 2021

5.54300

tbc Jun-22

Not expected

0.002780

tbc Jun-22

November 2021

5.366

tbc Jun-22

Not expected

0.00265

tbc Jun-22

December 2021

5.366

tbc Jun-22

Not expected

0.00265

tbc Jun-22

1. Initial billing rate based on internal forecast of cost
2. Reconciliation based on actual volumes and charges
3. Potential reconciliation reserved for extreme industry event such as settlement errors/data issues.

Find out more:

Contracts for Difference (CfD)

What is Contracts for Difference (CfD)?

CFD is an Electricity Market Reform (EMR) mechanism to help the UK meet its carbon reduction targets and ensure security of electricity supply.

The CfD charge is designed to support investment in new low-carbon generation, with a technology-dependent fixed price known as the 'strike price' (wholesale price + top-up subsidy). CfD costs will vary annually due to wholesale price fluctuations and amount of CfD generation produced in each year. Costs are met by a levy applied to energy suppliers, which are then passed on to consumers.

How CfD is charged

For both Half-Hourly (HH) and Non Half-Hourly (NHH) the cost will either be fully passed through (with subsequent reconciliation) or fixed into unit charges

CfD is made up of two elements, Supplier Obligation Cost and Operational Cost Levy. These are combined into one price calculated against the National Balancing Point (NBP) consumption for each individual MPAN The Supplier Obligation Cost reflects the amount of low-carbon electricity funded by the scheme. It reflects the subsidy paid to each CfD generator based on volume of energy generated and prevailing wholesale electricity costs.

The Operational Costs Levy reflects the running costs of the scheme set by the Local Carbon Contracts Company (LCCC).

A forecast rate will be applied to each invoice period for pass through contracts and reconciled once actual prices are known in accordance with the Settlement Calendar.

Green Excluded Energy (GEE)

GEE is a supplier level exemption that is not known until at least 6 months after the end of the quarter. This results in a further reconciliation being calculated and confirmed for each quarter. An estimate of GEE volume is included in the initial CFD forecast rate and, as of October 2021, will be applied to the quarterly reconciliation numbers provided by Low Carbon Contract Company (LCCC).

CfD charges (£/MWh) including Operational Rate:

  CfD charges (p/kWh) including Operational Rate
Delivery month Initial Billing Rate 1. Quarterly Reconciliation 2. GEE Volume Reconciliation 3.

December 2020

1.052

0.889

0.9261

January 2021

0.937

0.748

tbc Jan-22

February 2021

0.918

0.748

tbc Jan-22

March 2021

0.814

0.748

tbc Jan-22

April 2021

1.053

0.724 *

tbc Apr-22

May 2021

1.121

0.724 *

tbc Apr-22

June 2021

0.803

0.724 *

tbc Apr-22

July 2021

0.737

0.319

Not expected

August 2021

0.625

0.319

Not expected

September 2021

0.430

0.319

Not expected

October 2021

0.387

tbc Jan-22

Not expected

November 2021

-0.661

tbc Jan-22

Not expected

December 2021

-0.348

tbc Jan-22

Not expected

1. Initial billing rate based on internal forecast of cost
2. Reconciliation based on actual daily volumes and charges per quarterly outturn data provided by LCCC. As of Oct-21 this will also include a forecast of GEE volume. Numbers shown represent a quarterly average and will vary to billed amounts; however, daily values for the latest quarter are provided below.
3. GEE volume reconciliation. Daily values are provided below.
* Please note, £1.16/MWh (0.116 p/kWh) of the reconciliation results from last year's BEIS loan recovery for the Apr-20 to Jun-20 quarter

Quarterly reconciliation

Please refer to these workbooks for the individual daily rates: Daily CfD rates (Quarterly reconciliation) for July 21 to September 21

GEE Volume reconciliation

Please refer to these workbooks for individual daily rates: Daily CfD rates (GEE Volume reconciliation) for October 20 to December 20

Find out more about CfD:

Renewables Obligation (RO)

What is the Renewables Obligation (RO)?

The Renewables Obligation (RO) is a UK government scheme to support the development of large-scale renewable energy generation, in order to help meet the UK’s climate change objectives. It was introduced in 2002 but closed to all new generation contracts at the end of March 2017, and was replaced by the Contracts for Difference (CfD) scheme. Existing RO contracts will continue to run until 2027. The RO is funded by suppliers, with costs then recouped from consumers.

How RO is charged

RO can either be charged as a pass-through cost which will appear as a separate line item on invoices, or consolidated in the overall unit rate customers pay. Both these options are available to Half-Hourly (HH) and Non-Half Hourly (NHH) customers.

Forecast RO rates for pass through contracts are based on the published Buy Out Price and Obligation Level. npower Business Solutions (nBS) reserves the right to re-forecast pass-through levels in line with any RO shortfall/expected mutualisation impacts and will reconcile to actual costs once known.

RO pass-through rates:

  Renewable Obligation (p/kWh)
Delivery Month Initial billing rate1 Mutualisation Reconcilliation2 Further Mutualisation Reconcilliation3

December 2020

2.357

tbc Jan-22

Not expected

January 2021

2.357

tbc Jan-22

Not expected

February 2021

2.357

tbc Jan-22

Not expected

March 2021

2.357

tbc Jan-22

Not expected

April 2021

2.49936

tbc Jan-23

Not expected

May 2021

2.49936

tbc Jan-23

Not expected

June 2021

2.49936

tbc Jan-23

Not expected

July 2021

2.49936

tbc Jan-23

Not expected

August 2021

2.49936

tbc Jan-23

Not expected

September 2021

2.49936

tbc Jan-23

Not expected

October 2021

2.49936

tbc Jan-23

Not expected

November 2021

2.49936

tbc Jan-23

Not expected

December 2021

2.49936

tbc Jan-23

Not expected

1. Initial billing rate calculated using supplier obligation levels and buy out price
2. RO mutualisation reconciliation (triggered by shortfall of payments that exceed the mutualisation threshold)
3. Potential reconciliation based on shortfall of mutualisation payments

Find out more about RO:

Feed-in Tariff (FIT)

What is the Feed-in Tariff (FIT)?

Feed in Tariff is a government scheme designed to support small-scale renewable generation in businesses and homes. It was launched in 2010 and offers an index-linked payment for every kWh of energy produced for a 10-25 year period, with different rates for different technologies. It is funded by suppliers based on market share, with costs then recouped from consumers. The scheme closed to new entrants from 1 April 2019.

How FIT is charged

FIT can either be charged as a pass-through cost which will appear as a separate line item on invoices, or consolidated in the overall unit rate customers pay. Both these options are available to Half-Hourly (HH) and Non-Half Hourly (NHH) customers.

Costs for pass through contracts are not known up front so are initially estimated for each FIT year (1 April to 31 March). There will be a reconciliation performed during the October to December quarter after a FIT year has ended and the actual costs are known.

FIT pass-through rates:

  Feed In Tariff (p/kWh)
Delivery Month Initial Billing Rate1 Reconcilliation2 Revised Reconcilliation3

December 2020

0.72108

0.6982

Not expected

January 2021

0.72108

0.6982

Not expected

February 2021

0.72108

0.6982

Not expected

March 2021

0.72108

0.6982

Not expected

April 2021

0.66957

tbc Nov-22

Not expected

May 2021

0.67172

tbc Nov-22

Not expected

June 2021

0.67172

tbc Nov-22

Not expected

July 2021

0.67172

tbc Nov-22

Not expected

August 2021

0.67172

tbc Nov-22

Not expected

September 2021

0.67172

tbc Nov-22

Not expected

October 2021

0.64534

tbc Nov-22

Not expected

November 2021

0.64534

tbc Nov-22

Not expected

December 2021

0.64534

tbc Nov-22

Not expected

 

1. Initial billing rate based on internal forecast of cost
2. Reconciliation based on annual FiT levelisation
3. Potential reconciliation reserved for extreme industry event such as settlement errors/data issues/mutualisation.

Find out more about FiT:

Climate Change Levy (CCL)

 

What is the Climate Change Levy (CCL)?

CCL is a tax on the use of certain fuel and power, including gas and electricity, by non-domestic users in the UK.

It was introduced to incentivise businesses to reduce their energy consumption and to become more energy efficient, thereby reducing carbon emissions.

As your energy supplier, we collect this levy via your invoice on behalf of HMRC.

How CCL is charged

CCL is charged on the kWh of gas and electricity shown on your invoice. There are separate CCL rates which apply for gas and electricity.

The rates of CCL are usually increased annually at the start of the tax period from the 1st April.

CCL is not chargeable on:

  • Supplies for domestic use.
  • Supplies to charities in relation to their non-business activities.
  • Supplies to business customers who use very small quantities of energy.

Some supplies qualify for a reduced rate of CCL. Where that is the case, the customer must submit a PP11 Supplier Certificate to us in order for the relief to be applied to the account.

Further information on CCL, including the details of the exclusions and the reliefs, is available on the HMRC website.

CCL rates

  1 April 2018 to 31 March 2019 1 April 2019 to 31 March 2020 1 April 2020 to 31 March 2021 1 April 2021 to 31 March 2022
Electricity CCL rates

0.583 p/kWh (£5.83/MWh)

0.847 p/kWh (£8.47/MWh)

0.811 p/kWh (£8.11/MWh)

0.775 p/kWh (£7.75/MWh)

Gas CCL rates

0.203 p/kWh (£2.03/MWh)

0.339 p/kWh (£3.39/MWh)

0.406 p/kWh (£4.06/MWh)

0.465 p/kWh (£4.65/MWh)

Changes to electricity non-commodity charges

We remain committed to improving the products and services that we provide to our customers.

As part of this, we are launching a new account management system, set to offer you a host of benefits. As a result, there will be some changes and improvements to your invoicing, online account management, and non-commodity charges.

What are non-commodity charges?

Energy bills are made up of a combination of the commodity cost (the fuel you consume) and non-commodity costs. Included in the non-commodity costs are government-originated charges and third party charges.

What's changing?

Here you will find information about the changes to your non-commodity charges. Simply click on the charges below to find our more.

To hear the audio in the PDFs, please view them in a compatible browser or program such as Adobe Acrobat.

RO

Renewables Obligation (RO)

One of the main support mechanisms for large-scale renewable electricity projects in the UK.

Read More

BSUoS

Balancing Services Use of System (BSUoS)

Charge for keeping the UK’s electricity system in balance, including the cost of constraining generation.

Read more

CfD

Contracts for Difference (CfD)

Support scheme for low carbon generators, providing long-term price certainty to increase investment for certain technologies.

Read more

TNUoS

Transmission Network Use of System (TNUoS)

Charge for using and maintaining the transmission network

Read more

CM

Capacity Mechanism (CM)

Charge to ensure we have sufficient power available to meet future needs

Read more

FIT

Feed-in Tariff (FIT)

Levied on suppliers to fund the FIT scheme, designed to incentivise new small scale renewable generation in business and homes.

Read More

DUoS

Distribution Use of System (DUoS)

Recovers the cost of installing and maintaining the local distribution networks.

Read more

CCL

Climate Change Levy (CCL)

A tax on energy aimed at increasing energy efficiency and reducing carbon emissions.

Read more

VAT

Value Added Tax (VAT)

An indirect tax levied on goods and services.

Read More

REGO

Renewable Energy Guarantees of Origin (REGO)

A scheme to provide transparency about the proportion of electricity fed from renewable sources.

Read more

Standing and metering charges

Charges for the Data Collector (DC), Data Aggregator (DA) and Meter Operator (MOP)

Read more

Non-energy related charges

A separate agreement for on-supply customers, relating to non-energy related charges.

Read more

Contact us

For a new quote or a renewal please call:

Show Phone Number 0800 644 6135

We're open:
Monday-Friday 9am-5pm.
Excluding public holidays.

Request a call back

Request a call back

Contact us

For a new quote or a renewal please call:

Show Phone Number 0800 644 6135

We're open:
Monday-Friday 9am-5pm.
Excluding public holidays.

Request a call back

Request a call back

Contact us

For a new quote or a renewal please call:

Show Phone Number 0800 669 6443

We’re open:
Monday-Friday 9am-5pm.
Excluding public holidays.

Request a call back

Request a call back

Contact us

To discuss a quote or a renewal for one of your clients please call:

Show Phone Number 0800 193 6866

We’re open:
Monday-Friday 9am-5pm.
Excluding public holidays.

Request a call back

Request a call back